Mineral Contents and Somatometric Parameters in the Hemimandible, Tibia and Incisor of Rats Submitted to a Hypothalamic Obesity Condition

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Ana Cláudia Dalmolin, Adrielly Renata Rosa, Sabrina Grassiolli, Maria Albertina de Miranda Soares, Nadia Fayez Omar, Camila Audrey Reis, Cristina Lucia Sant’Ana Costa Ayub and José Rosa Gomes
 

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a degenerative disease, causing several metabolic disturbances in different systems of the body. However, the effects of obesity on the development of mineralized tissues have not been well explored.
Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypothalamic obesity, induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) on morphometric parameters in the tibia, hemimandible and incisor tooth in rats, as well as on the mineral content in the tibia, enamel and dentine.
Materials and Methods: Twelve male Wistar rats were separated in a Control and experimental groups (MSG). The Control group received a daily subcutaneous injection of saline solution, while MSG group received the dose of 4 g/kg of body weight, on the five first days after birth. On the 90th day, all rats were dead to be evaluated the Lee Index (LI), retroperitoneal fat deposit, the bone weight, density, volume, morphometric and mineral content.
Results: In the MSG group the LI, retroperitoneal fat deposits and bone density were significantly increased while the bone weight, volume, and morphometric parameters were significantly decreased. The percentage of phosphorus was reduced and calcium was increased in the MSG group.
Conclusion: In the obesity induced by MSG the mineral bone content is altered and produced significant changes in the somatometric parameters in the rat hemimandible, tibia and incisor.

Published on: October 1, 2018
doi: 10.17756/jocd.2018-019
Citation: Dalmolin AC, Rosa AR, Grassiolli S, de Miranda Soares MA, Omar NF, et al. 2018. Mineral Contents and Somatometric Parameters in the Hemimandible, Tibia and Incisor of Rats Submitted to a Hypothalamic Obesity Condition. J Obes Chronic Dis 2(2): 57-61.
 
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